What Is A Black Russian Terrier?

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Today, we are talking about The Black Russian Terrier.

The origin of the Black Russian terrier is that is a relatively young dog breed.
They were first developed in the 1940s in Russia by crossbreeding Giant Schnauzers, Newfoundlands, Airedale terriers, and Rottweilers, however, the predominant and most important ancestor is the Giant Schnauzer. The breed was recognized by the FCI in 1984.

The Black Russian Terrier is large and majestic and a little bit mysterious but is definitely a highly intelligent dog breed.

They’re not terriers. The name suggests it but they’re not true terriers. In reality, this breed is classified as a working dog. It’s believed that about 17 breeds were used in its development.

They were born out of necessity.

Many breeds are developed to help cover a specific need, like herding, hunting, companionship, and more. This is no different for the black Russian terrier, except that the breed was born in the Soviet army’s Red Star kennel. immediately before and during the Cold War era, Soviet scientists were tasked with developing the ideal working dog that could patrol borders, chase down intruders and guard workcamp prisons, and more. Insurance was a key consideration.

Along with the ability to stay warm in the frigid Russian winters.

The black Russian terrier exudes strength, power, and agility. The ideal BRT has large bones a large head thick neck, a pronounced chest, and prominent musculature. Since ancestral crates have several foundation breeds live on within the modern BRT. The body type can vary from line to line.

Character Of A BRT

Are Black Russian Terriers smart?

Yes! They are smart dogs!

Are Black Russian Terriers aggressive?

They can be, when necessary. They are protective of their pack and because of that, they would be protective of you and your home. It’s natural for them.

The Black Russian terrier is a natural pack member to their family or owners and they are very loyal and affectionate towards them, but they are not very trusting towards strangers.

You should socialize them easily so they get used to other people and animals. BRT’s are also pretty affectionate when they are at home and they are great with kids, but you should never leave a small child with a dog unsupervised.

As we always say here, it’s about making sure your children understand that dogs are not toys. BRT’s are quite formidable in terms of size and power so to avoid any kind of accidents, always make sure introductions between children and animals like this are carefully coordinated.

Health Of A BRT

The Black Russian Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 11 years, is prone to minor health issues such as elbow dysplasia and major problems like canine hip dysplasia (CHD).
The breed may also suffer from progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and dwarfism.

Weight Of A BRT

They are very intelligent and very large, the males are down 72 to 78 centimeters at the withers. Compared to the females 68 to 74 centimeters. The male weighs between 50 and 60 kilograms, and the females weigh between 45 and 50 kilograms. even larger dogs are seen among this breed.

Coat Care Of A Black Russian Terrier

They are low shedders. The black Russian terrier is a double-coated breed with a wavy wiry topcoat, a dense undercoat, and long facial furnishings including a fall over the eyes and a lengthy beard.

The standard color is black. Although dogs with black with some scattered gray hairs are seen. Many dogs have light gray hairs interspersed throughout the coat. This is a low shedding breed that needs grooming several times a week to prevent tangles.

However, they do have a thick undercoat which means they shared more than dogs with a single coat. This is typically noticeable in fall and springtime as they blow coat. This is a natural process and not something you want to attempt to stop by any means.

Proper regular grooming will minimize the effect of this though, which is something every black Russian terrier owner will have to do anyway because their coats require above-average attention.

Life Expectancy Of A BRT

-How long do black Russian terriers live?

Generally, they have a fairly short lifespan of 10 to 12 years which is a shame as they are such wonderful dogs.

Price Of A BRT

These dogs are beautiful and are often involved in showing so the price can reflect this. A puppy could run you between $1800 to $2500 maybe more for a dog that has come from show parents.

How-To-Find-A-Good-Dog-Breeder

As we always say on here, do your best research and due diligence when going down the breeder route.

 

Exercise Requirements Of A BRT

Generally, a couple of hours of decent exercise a day and your BRT will be a happy dog. Two or three decent walks and some play-related activities and you will have a happy and fit dog.

As a rule of thumb, these could be considered as a good first-time owner-dog as long as you research the breed well and offer the needs to this breed in terms of exercise and care.

There are no known issues with the temperament of these magnificent dogs other than their natural wariness of strangers and they socialize well.

Trainability Of A BRT

The black Russian terrier learns quickly and will respond to kind firm consistent training. Don’t make him repeat the same action too many times. They’re smart and become bored easily. So keep training sessions short and interesting, or they’ll wander off to find something better to do.

Use positive reinforcement training techniques such as praise, play, and food rewards.

Summary

Home is where you are to them, provided they receive daily exercise and mental stimulation through training sport playing, or walking.
Russian terriers will not need much room to spare and have zero problems living in large and small living spaces, including apartments.
This dog is not suited to a life of isolation, living in a kennel or alone in a yard.
They have to be close to their people sharing living quarters and daily activities.
BRT’s are extremely loyal and form close bonds with their owners and family members.
These dogs also make good service dogs, therapy dogs, canine police units, and increasingly, search and rescue dogs.

As stated earlier, a fine example of a breed that would take to a novice owner well as long as that novice owner was prepared to make sure this breeds essential and not too demanding needs were met.

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